Category: Exhibitions & Publications (page 3 of 5)

Forest Breath – 2018

Photo:  Leila Sujir’s still from Forest Breath!, 3D stereographic video installation, 2018.

Supernatural: Art, Technology and the Forest

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria exhibition

May 19, 2018 – September 3, 2018

Forest Breath (10 minutes, Stereoscopic 3D video installation, 2018) 

Forest Breath is a vertical slice of 8k stereoscopic 3D video of the forest. Shot in June 2016, the video records particular moments in the forests around Port Renfrew, primarily in the south Walbran, near Emerald Pool, as well as in the Red Creek Fir area in the traditional territories of the Pacheedaht people.

The resolution of the video allows viewers to stand in a forest of moving pixels. The video space has volume, a blur of colors, as it moves from one space of the forest to another. The space of the video, like the space of the forest, becomes a site of contemplation and research.

The Art Gallery of Greater Victoria in the city of Victoria contains spaces of forests. With the support of the gallery, I have placed the forest here, in the wall of one of the galleries. It is an archive of the time and space in June 2016 when I did a preliminary shoot for the project, Forest Breath.

Closeby to Victoria, along the coast, is Port Renfrew, surrounded by old growth forests; the town, I am being told and have observed, is reinventing itself, no longer depending on what was formerly a resource based economy.

These forests drew me as a space of research and a space of healing.

These west coast forests are also where my mother took me as a young twenty four year old, after a serious operation for cancer. I didn’t die, to my surprise. The forest was where I found wonder and learned how to be alive again.

My aunt Manorama Savur’s last major research project* which she talked extensively to me about was on the destruction of the bamboo forests of India and the resulting desertification as a result of the deforestation, two words which were and still are mysterious to me.

When I started the Forest Breath project, in June 2016, a  year  had almost passed since my mother had passed away, on my birthday, June 19; as a way of anticipating that strange collision, the  anniversary of her death and my birthday, I started this project in the forest.

*Manorama Savur, And the Bamboo Forests in the Indian Forests: What did the Pulp and Paper Industry do? Manohar Publishers, 2003.

Artist: Leila Sujir

Technical Director: Jorge Zavagno

Cinematographer: Chris Kroitor

Camera Assistant: Andréann Cossette-Viau

Production Assistant: Jackson Sujir

Assistant Editor: Daniela Ortiz Sanchez Renero

Sound Recording: Leila Sujir & Jorge Zavagno

Sound Editor: Philippe Battikha

Supernatural at the AGGV

SUPERNATURAL

Art, Technology and the Forest

May 19, 2018 – September 3, 2018

Twentieth century photography has made an important contribution to constructing the idea of the forest as natural heritage, promoting the beauty of national parks and forest landscapes. However, contemporary artists, drawing on this legacy, and working with new photo-based technologies, are bringing a critical lens to this history of representation.

Supernatural: Art, Technology and the Forest features contemporary photo and video-based work by artists working in British Columbia who are using technology to consider the idea of the forest as a social and cultural artefact. The exhibition explores how photographic technologies have mediated and shaped our relationship to forests and forest ecologies; and how computer generated imaging and 3D technologies are suggesting the need for a new approach to our relationship with the trees.

Featuring artists Mike Mclean, Trudi Lynn Smith, Ayumi Goto, Dan Siney, Leila Sujir,  Ian Wallace, Sandra Semchuk, Carol Sawyer and Kelly Richardson.

*Please note that we will be previewing Kelly Richardson’s The Erudition starting from April 20 in the Founders Gallery.

https://aggv.ca/exhibits/supernatural-art-technology-and-the-forest/

 

 

Photo:  Leila Sujir’s still from Forest Breath!, 3D stereographic video installation, 2018.

Reblog: Four of FotoFest’s Dazzling Displays Focus on Indian Portraiture

Photo: Leila Sujir combines video of lost-looking but regal peacocks with floating animations in her stereoscopic 3D video projection, “Peacocks Dream.”

Four of FotoFest’s dazzling displays focus on Indian portraiture

 India, so vast and complex in its history and cultural influence, makes a head-spinning subject for the FotoFest 2018 Biennial.

Technically, as director Steven Evans explained, “It’s not really about India. It’s about these artists of Indian origin and what their concerns are.”

Through that lens, he and curator Sunil Gupta also are showing that India is not a monolithic place. “It’s got 140 official languages, with 600 languages spoken; multiple religions and ethnicities; concerns of philosophy, language, indigenous people, environment and a new queer sensibility emerging,” Evans said.

Viewers may be dazzled, or dazed, by the busy mix of images that unfold across four venues.

A few categories emerge through what appears to be a scattershot organization: Documentary work and portraiture (especially self-portraiture that employs elaborate impersonations to explore identity) are especially strong.

Most of the 47 featured artists live and work in India. That context matters.

Gupta contrasts India’s contemporary photography scene with that of China, which has 60 schools, a thriving publishing industry and numerous art fairs. In India, art photography is still the activity of the English-speaking elite, he said.

FotoFest’s abundance of documentary photography from numerous regions reflects artists’ familiarity with India’s documentary filmmaking tradition, he said. “It’s not because they know Walker Evans.”

But they do know technology. Like others around the world, India’s contemporary artists have embraced new technology because it’s accessible, cheap to produce and gives them “a certain kind of global credibility,” Gupta said.

About a third of this biennial features new media installations — the most ever — although it doesn’t feel that way because the rooms devoted to projected work are sprinkled across the venues.

Four installations — three by female artists — have stayed with me for their evocative storytelling. There’s one more week to see those at the three locations near Fotofest headquarters; Asia Society Texas Center’s smaller portion is up through late July.

‘Peacocks Dream’

During the opening reception in March, Leila Sujir’s “Peacocks Dream” turned an alcove of the Silver Street Studios building into a spectacle. I fell into its spell on a quieter day, when the nearly 16-minute stereoscopic 3-D (SD3) video, or anaglyph, was projected onto just one wall and I could don 3-D glasses, sit on a bench and hear the audio component.

Regal peacocks amble through a garden of mazes at what appears to be an ancient estate in England, looking out of place with their exotic, brilliant plumage, as viewers hear the measured reading of letters between family members who are worlds apart. Sujir layers funny animated peacocks, floating paisley designs and a fanciful border onto the photography, touches of levity that balance the melancholy tone.

She lives in Montreal. The letters are from her family’s archive, written from her paternal grandfather in Mangalore, India, to her father, who died young, in his mid-30s, in a plane crash in Canada. For years, she feared that her father’s story would become her own because his journeys placed him in precarious positions, too far away from home. Her narrative is abstract enough that “Peacocks Dream” expresses a universal sense of disorientation and loss.

SD3 dates from the mid-1800s but has evolved. Anaglyphs combine superimposed imagery and colored filters. Sujir has experimented with projection mapping, which places SD3 video space into the built environment — to create installations — for more than a decade. She appreciates the “haptic sense of space” it creates to help convey themes of migration that have intrigued her for 30 years. “SD3 video spaces are elastic and dream-like places, ephemeral, yet capable of extending a sensation of volume, physicality, and presence to the viewer,” she writes.

Watching “Peacocks Dream” made me wish I could see Sujir’s entire “Elastic City Spacey” series.

 

To read the full article click here

Reverberations of a Topological Daydream at Forest City Gallery

REVERBERATIONS OF A TOPOLOGICAL DAYDREAM

A solo exhibition by Santiago Tavera
March 2, 2018 to April 13, 2018
Opening reception: Friday, March 2, 7:00pm – 9:00pm

Reverberations of a Topological Daydream is a multimedia architectural installation that presents a virtual space in constant translation between physical and digital experiences. Multiple video projections and 3D graphic animations immerse the gallery space, taking viewers into the vastness of a virtual suburban galaxy. Within this constructed digital environment, plexiglass and vinyl structures are used as reflective screens and visual filters, which are activated through the light of the projected image. Memories and sensations are translated around the space through the repetitions and echoes of images and sounds, creating a perceptual topology of virtual reverberations. Topology, as a mathematical term, refers to the exploration of how shapes preserve their permanence in change, by only bending, twisting and stretching, without ever breaking and losing their original self.

This multimedia exhibition presents digital architectural houses as sites of refuge, where memories and illusions emerge, and where perception collides with that of the immediate future and the re-constructed past. Interlacing the role of an outside observer with the one that inhabits an interior site, viewers virtually journey through a familiar place. Viewers inhabit the exhibition space, while virtual spaces are consequently inhabiting them. Reverberations of a Topological Daydream, aims to illustrate the impact digital culture has on how we form our identity within multiple realms. Digital media allows subjects to constantly navigate between perception, memory, physicality and the virtual. Individuals find themselves in a never-ending process of constructing and re-constructing their sense of being, and in turn their sense of belonging. Dislocation, familiar to those who have experienced cultural displacement, has become more apparent as subjects now live as virtual immigrants within the realm of the digital. In cyberspace, subjects and objects exist as images that are constantly moving from one screen to the next, a virtual dislocation similar to the one of a migrant body. Within a state of dislocation, as the displacement of the conscious mind, the body experiences a double sense of place with multiple perceptions and memories. There is a simultaneous sense of being physically here and virtually there, while belonging everywhere and nowhere.

 

XL-Outer Worlds- Upcoming Project with Leila Sujir

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the invention of IMAX  Janine Marchessault of the Public Access Collective and Christian Kroitor (grandson of IMAX inventor Roman Kroitor) of True Frame Productions have come together to commission five new large-format digital film shorts as part of a three- day festival in 2019. The festival will take place at the Cinesphere, the world’s first permanent IMAX movie theatre located in Toronto at Ontario Place.  The theme of the program in true IMAX form, centres around the larger-than-life landscape that forms an outer world.  The festival will include works by Canadian artists: Oliver Husain, Lisa Jackson, Kelly Richardson, Michael Snow, and Leila Sujir.

The festival is aimed at celebrating the invention of IMAX by showcasing the commissioned films alongside a selection of early IMAX productions. The XL-Outer Worlds festival  is expected to later tour the first IMAX cinemas across Canada in Victoria, Sudbury, Edmonton and Montreal.

This project was funded through the Canada Council for the Arts’ New Chapter program. 

For more information check out the link below:

https://www.outerworlds.org/

Or check out the announcement made by Canadian Art:

https://canadianart.ca/news/news-brief-museum-show-justin-bieber/

 

E-Flux Announcement- FotoFest Publication Launch

We’re please to announce FotoFest’s publication launch INDIA/Contemporary Photographic and New Media Art as part of the FotoFest 2018 Biennial in Houston, Texas happening this March 10–April 22, 2018The publication features images, statements, and biographies  from participating artists within the festival, including Elastic Spaces’ Leila Sujir! The book will be available worldwide beginning in March.

Check out the link for more information:

http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/167958/india-contemporary-photographic-and-new-media-art/

For a list of all participating artists check out the link just released by ArtNews

http://www.artnews.com/2017/12/18/fotofest-international-reveals-artist-list-2018-edition/

Upcoming in March! See Leila Sujir at FotoFest:

http://home.fotofest.org/2018biennial/default.aspx#.Wj0hGisTGaN

FotoFest International is pleased to announce the names of the 48 featured artists in the central exhibition for its upcoming FOTOFEST 2018 BIENNIAL

The FotoFest 2018 Biennial, March 10 – April 22, 2018, is dedicated to INDIA: Contemporary Photographic and New Media Art. FotoFest 2018 speaks to a number of contemporary issues in India including gender and sexuality, land rights conflict, the environment, human settlement and migration, and caste and class divisions. The participating artists are from India and the global Indian diaspora.

Organized by Lead Curator Sunil Gupta and FotoFest Executive Director Steven Evans, FotoFest 2018 will be one of the largest exhibitions of contemporary photography by artists of Indian origin to be presented in the United States. The artists were handpicked by Mr. Gupta and Mr. Evans while journeying through multiple cities in India and across the world.

ISEA2017 & The International Image Festival of Manizales

Anthony Head (Bath, UK) and Santiago Tavera (Montreal, QC) attended one of the world’s most prominent international arts and technology events, the International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA). This years ISEA aligned with the XVI International Image Festival of Manizales in Colombia from the 11th to the 18th of June. Head and Tavera organized an experimental and interactive workshop titled, Projected Narratives of Being and Belonging, in collaboration with Colombian and Canadian artist, Laura Acosta.

The workshop invited interdisciplinary artists to collaborate on an multiple video projection installation in La Universidad de Caldas. Over 20 participants combined fictional and personal narratives of belonging or displacement along with video experimentation. The workshop brought together scholars and artists to an interdisciplinary discussion and showcase of creative productions applying new technologies in art. This year’s conference theme, Bio-creation and Peace, encouraged participants to reflect on the contributions and alternatives that art, design and technology provide for social development, biodiversity and the establishment of peaceful relationships between diverse communities. The workshop Projected Narratives of Being and Belonging generated social collaboration between participants in order to work towards conflict resolutions between heritage surfaces and subjective narratives, past histories and illusions of the future, and finally, effects of war and visions of peace. 

Furthermore Tavera had the opportunity to give an artist talk on his creative-research, Translational Spaces which will also be published in the upcoming ISEA 2017 special issues in the Virtual Creativity Journal, Intellect Books later this year.


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ISEA2017

http://www.isea2017.info/

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