Tag: digital art

Forest Breath – 2018

Photo:  Leila Sujir’s still from Forest Breath!, 3D stereographic video installation, 2018.

Supernatural: Art, Technology and the Forest

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria exhibition

May 19, 2018 – September 3, 2018

Forest Breath (10 minutes, Stereoscopic 3D video installation, 2018) 

Forest Breath is a vertical slice of 8k stereoscopic 3D video of the forest. Shot in June 2016, the video records particular moments in the forests around Port Renfrew, primarily in the south Walbran, near Emerald Pool, as well as in the Red Creek Fir area in the traditional territories of the Pacheedaht people.

The resolution of the video allows viewers to stand in a forest of moving pixels. The video space has volume, a blur of colors, as it moves from one space of the forest to another. The space of the video, like the space of the forest, becomes a site of contemplation and research.

The Art Gallery of Greater Victoria in the city of Victoria contains spaces of forests. With the support of the gallery, I have placed the forest here, in the wall of one of the galleries. It is an archive of the time and space in June 2016 when I did a preliminary shoot for the project, Forest Breath.

Closeby to Victoria, along the coast, is Port Renfrew, surrounded by old growth forests; the town, I am being told and have observed, is reinventing itself, no longer depending on what was formerly a resource based economy.

These forests drew me as a space of research and a space of healing.

These west coast forests are also where my mother took me as a young twenty four year old, after a serious operation for cancer. I didn’t die, to my surprise. The forest was where I found wonder and learned how to be alive again.

My aunt Manorama Savur’s last major research project* which she talked extensively to me about was on the destruction of the bamboo forests of India and the resulting desertification as a result of the deforestation, two words which were and still are mysterious to me.

When I started the Forest Breath project, in June 2016, a  year  had almost passed since my mother had passed away, on my birthday, June 19; as a way of anticipating that strange collision, the  anniversary of her death and my birthday, I started this project in the forest.

*Manorama Savur, And the Bamboo Forests in the Indian Forests: What did the Pulp and Paper Industry do? Manohar Publishers, 2003.

Artist: Leila Sujir

Technical Director: Jorge Zavagno

Cinematographer: Chris Kroitor

Camera Assistant: Andréann Cossette-Viau

Production Assistant: Jackson Sujir

Assistant Editor: Daniela Ortiz Sanchez Renero

Sound Recording: Leila Sujir & Jorge Zavagno

Sound Editor: Philippe Battikha

Leila Sujir Presents at Mat’Inno: la réalité virtuelle

Leila Sujir talked about the use of immersive technologies within the arts and how they are being used by many digital artists. This presentation was moderated by Martin Lessard (reporter at the radio show La Sphère on ICI Radio-Canada Première) and also invited Prof. Michael J. McGuffin from the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS).  During the 4th edition on May 19th, and presented during Printemps Numérique- Montreal, the topic focused on virtual reality and innovation related to immersive environments.

About Mat’Inno:
In partnership with the Jeune Chambre de Commerce de Montreal, the Quartier de l’innovation organizes 5 morning conferences on hot topics throughout the year. Montreal is the biggest academic city in Canada and this event gives the opportunity for professors from our member universities to present their academic expertise in a dynamic environment. The overall objective is to give citizens and members of the business community insights into a variety of markets and business sectors.

Click here for more information!

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Translational Spaces by Santiago Tavera

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Santiago Tavera’s thesis project,  Translational Spaces, consists of an artist book project, interactive web-project & digital installation, exploring the potential of digital media to simulate the state of a migrant body while being contained in a physical place.

Santiago’s graduating thesis exhibition continues at Agence Topo until April 30th, 2016, where the artist is also doing three reading sessions.

Click here for more information!

New project funding, from SSHRC, awarded to Elastic 3D Spaces

“Exploring Elastic 3D Space: Bodies and Belonging” gives three years of project funding for our art project initiatives. April 4, 2016.

Exploring Elastic 3D Spaces: Bodies and Belonging will develop a linked cycle of site-specific artworks that explore urgent global questions of migration, displacement, belonging and empathy, using the immersive potential of stereoscopic 3D (S3D) space. Merging old and new technologies in a custom-built, innovative way, and taking up stories embedded in public policies and places, the art works will use projections onto public structures and within gallery spaces to explore mythologies of belonging. Most broadly, the artworks consider how subjectivity, body and cognition are affected by engagement with 3D stereoscopic technologies. (Stereoscopy refers to a method of viewing or displaying stereographic images that creates or enhances the illusion of depth and volume. Despite its 150-year history and recent commercial revival, stereoscopy’s potential for creating fictional 3D worlds is just now being fully explored by artists, with those in the worldwide vanguard being the partners and collaborators, here).

This SSHRC Partnership Development Project emerges from the on-going collaborations of 12 researchers in stereoscopic 3D virtual spaces, working across an international network. Over three years, researchers from Concordia University, the University of Québec à Montréal, Bath Spa University (UK), Emily Carr University of Art + Design (Canada), University of Sydney and University of Tasmania (Australia) will team up with Janro Holdings (Montreal home of the S3D drawing tool Sandde) and the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Together, this team of artist-researchers, working with researchers in the fields of Design Interaction, Computer Science and Performance Studies, will develop art projects based in archival fact, artistic fiction and personal stories of migration, investigating across partner sites the potential of 3D stereoscopic space in research-creation. Partners will create artistic works spanning expanded media arts, expanded cinema and interaction, performance design, projection mapping and digital drawing. For instance, principal investigator Leila Sujir will create the Partnership’s lynchpin S3D artwork with partner institution, Bath Spa University’s School of Art (UK). Sujir’s Elastic City Spacey will be an immersive stereoscopic 3D projection for the exterior architectural space of the streets of Bath, inviting visitors to share space with the ghosts of history, to walk into the story. Similarly, with the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Sujir will create an interior projection where the viewer can immerse herself, move and interact, feeling through fully embodied engagement, the stories of past characters and the fantasies of future possibilities – with respect to localized, historical questions of place and belonging. The proposed 3-year research project builds on Sujir’s established research-creation practice, which in the last decade has evoked bodily-felt experience of displacement through stereoscopic 3D (S3D) spaces. These are dreamlike and ephemeral, yet capable of offering a sensation of volume, physicality, and presence to the viewer: they move as the viewer moves, giving a sense of space as ‘elastic.’ As conceived here, S3D elastic spaces are sites for viewers to explore other worlds: the virtual space becomes place – paradoxically, where one can experience displacement and empathy – in an innovative, evocative transformation not achieved in conventional virtual space paradigms. The partnership team’s innovative approach takes the investigation of virtual reality out of the more familiar electronic CAVE and into the public street and built environment, and further, proposes that the visitors not be seated/stationary but mobile – approaches that are currently of great industry interest.

The partners and collaborators are guided by a shared an over-arching research focus: we explore how, in the future, when techniques such as 3D stereoscopy mean that everyone can see in a computer-enhanced way, our new sensory capabilities may affect people’s engagement with the places and people around them, our senses of belonging, connection and agency, our creative expression through art-making. Together, the partners aim to create 10 new projects (performative and publication) to be displayed and disseminated in 10 venues worldwide, reaching a wide gamut of audiences; develop ground-breaking new technologies for stereoscopic 3D creation; engage and train 8 student research assistants; and confer and brainstorm at a second-year Summit – developing professional relationships and creative technologies that will be the basis of further collaborations and partnerships.

 

© 2018 Elastic Spaces