Category: News (Page 2 of 12)

LASER 9 Forests Drawing Close

LASER 9 Hexagram Montréal

https://hexagram.ca/index.php/eng/hidden-future-events/510-laser-9-forests-drawing-close-eng

Leila Sujir and Jorge Zavagno will talk about the development of a series of video projects focusing on the old-growth forests, collaboration with the community in their practice, and the possibilities brought by considering walking rather than seated viewers. The monumental scale of the video projections and the “elastic depth” of the 3D images render the work immersive, integrating the spectators’ corporal movements into its reception.


Free online video conferencing via Hexagram’s YouTube Channel or directly on Hexagram’s Interdisciplinary SummitWeb platform.

In English| Free

This edition of the LASER series proposes to build on current artistic, anthropological, architectural and scientific research about forest ecosystems for enriching discussions about biodiversity and creativity. Forest agencies of humans and more-than-humans point to manifold affordances, combining their inner and outer workings to inhabit convergent worlds. The speakers will discuss the following topics : visualizing respect and memory of old-growth forests with high-definition video and stereoscopic technologies (Sujir and Zavagno), deciphering the inner network of tree sap flow functions with 3D microscopic imagery in periods of drought (Lourenço) as well as recent trends in architectural designs in Finland pointing to the resurgence of wood, a qualitative housing endeavour to kindle the senses (Howes).

Through the interplay of sensing bodies and technologies, Forests Drawing Close will be an encounter with conditions of proximity about tree relations, up close and afar.

This LASER edition is presented in the context of Hexagram’s 1st Interdisciplinary Summit Web Platform entitled Sympoietics : The Sharing of Agency and Autonomy. (https://rencontres.hexagram.ca/).

Publication- Practices of Projection: Histories and Technologies

Elastic Spaces directors, Leila Sujir (Concordia University) and Anthony Head (Bath Spa University), have contributed a chapter to the recently published book, Practices of Projection: Histories and Technologies edited by Gabriel Menotti and Virginia Crisp by Oxford University Press.

To many, the technological aspects of projection often go unnoticed, only brought to attention during moments of crisis or malfunction. For example, when a movie theater projector falters, the audience suddenly looks toward the back of the theater to see a sign of mechanical failure. The history of cinema similarly shows that the attention to projection has been most focused when the whole medium is hanging in suspension. During Hollywood’s economic consolidation in the ’30s, projection defined the ways that sync-sound technologies could be deployed within the medium. Most recently, the digitization of cinema repeated this process as technology was reworked to facilitate mobility. These examples show how projection continually speaks to the rearrangement of media technology. Projection therefore needs to be examined as a pivotal element in the future of visual media’s technological transition. In Practices of Projection: Histories and Technologies, volume editors Gabriel Menotti and Virginia Crisp address the cultural and technological significance of projection. Throughout the volume, chapters reiterate that projection cannot, and must not, be reduced to its cinematic functions alone. Borrowing media theorist Siegfried Zielinksi’s definition, Menotti and Crisp refer to projection as the “heterogeneous array of artefacts, technical systems, and particularly visual praxes of experimentation and of culture.” From this, readers can understand the performative character of the moving image and the labor of the different actors involved in the utterance of the film text. Projection is not the same everywhere, nor equal all the time. Its systems are in permanent interaction with environmental circumstances, neighboring structures, local cultures, and social economies. Thus the idea of projection as a universal, fully autonomous operation cannot hold. Each occurrence of projection adds nuance to a wider understanding of film screening technologies.

ISBN019093414X, 9780190934149

Santiago Tavera & Laura Acosta – If I saw you, I don’t remember – MAI exhibition

Photos x Paul Litherland

MFA alumni and current Elastic Spaces’ visiting scholar, Santiago Tavera, along his collaborator, Laura Acosta are currently exhibiting their new work, The Novels of Elsgüer (Episode 5); If I saw you, I don’t remember, at MAI – Montréal, Arts Interculturels.

February 8th – March 7th, 2020 Vernissage: February 8th, 2020 at 7:00pm

The Novels of Elsgüer (Episode 5); If I saw you, I don’t remember is an immersive audiovisual installation and performance piece that translates the movements of an unseen body into visual data in the form of hairlike filament animations, intermittent reflections, and flickering shadows. As a sensorial experience, this work asks how different individuals – visible or not- have the potential to create new spaces, raising questions on perception of visibility, inclusion and exclusion. This is the fifth episode in a series of transdisciplinary installations co-created by Colombian-Canadian artists Santiago Tavera and Laura Acosta since 2015.

Montreal, Arts Interculturels – MAI

Daniela Ortiz and Diego Ortiz – Winners of 10th Illustrated Book Competition

MFA alumni and current Elastic Spaces’ visiting scholar, Daniela Ortiz Sanchez, along with the author and her brother, Diego Ortiz, are the recipients of the 10th edition of the 2019 International Competition of Illustrated Books, with their book titled, ‘La mano del señor Echegaray’, in collaboration with the Library Insular Gran Canaria and the Catalan publisher, A Buen Paso.

Click here for more information

Santiago Tavera – Passages Convergents CAM en Tournée

Photos x Franck Billaud

In 2018 visiting scholar, Santiago Tavera was part of Passages Convergents, an exhibition that was selected for the Conseil des arts de Montréal Touring program / CAM en Tournée.

The first exhibition opens this Thursday, Jan. 23 with a vernissage at the Maison de la culture Notre-Dame-de-Grâce in Montréal at 5:30pm.

January 24th, 2020 – March 29th, 2020 Vernissage: January 23rd, 2020 at 5:30pm

Exhibition – Rebellious: Alberta Women Artists in the 1980s

November 9, 2019 –February 17, 2020

https://www.youraga.ca/exhibitions/rebellious 

Alberta women artists responded to the 1980s with rebellion, provocation and activism. This exhibition reveals the shifting mores of the most tumultuous era in Alberta’s history and includes work by the most influential Alberta artists of the 1980s who continue to shape Canadian art. These artists pushed boundaries with their methods of working, their subject matter, and by expanding the ways in which one could be an artist. Utilizing a range of tactics from satire and humour to social critique these artists exposed and worked against established artistic and societal conventions alike. Don’t miss this exhibition featuring the works of strong Alberta women artists of the 1980s, who significantly contributed to the contemporary landscape of Alberta art.

Organized by the Art Gallery of Alberta. Curated by Lindsey Sharman. Supported by artist patrons Maggie & John Mitchell, Bonnie Abel, Marianne & Allan Scott, Annika Nordhagen & James Wolfli, Marcia & Willem Langenberg, and Edward Stidworthy Johnson.

Sandra Bromley, Catherine Burgess, Isla Burns, Joane Cardinal Schubert, RCA, Vera Gartley, Alexandra Haeseker, RCA, Joice M. Hall, Faye HeavyShield, Liz Ingram, Mary Joyce, Toyo Kawamura, Jane Kidd, Lylian Klimek, Pauline McGeorge, Rita McKeough, Katie Ohe, Lyndal Osborne, Jane Ash Poitras, CM RCA, Teresa Posyniak, Mary Scott, Arlene Stamp, Leila Sujir, Carroll Taylor-Lindoe, Wendy Toogood

Curator
Lindsey V. Sharman is Curator of the Art Gallery of Alberta. She has studied Art History and Curating in Canada, England, Switzerland and Austria, earning degrees from the University of Saskatchewan and the University of the Arts, Zurich. From 2012-2018 she was the first curator of the Founders’ Gallery at the Military Museums in Calgary, an academic appointment through the University of Calgary. Her primary area of research is politically and socially engaged art practice. Curatorial projects of note include TRENCH, a durational performance by Adrian Stimson; Felled Trees, an exhibition deconstructing national identity at Canada House, London; Gassed Redux by Adad Hannah; and the nationally touring retrospective The Writing on the Wall: Works of Dr. Joane Cardinal Schubert

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